First two publicly available prints

My first two prints
are now available through the Gnomon workshop. The Apple and the Four
Wire Heads, will be the first released. The posters, printed on 100lb
Centura Gloss paper are sized at around 27" X 40 ".

The excellent artist Feng Zhu has also released two wonderful new images.

"Since
we started The Gnomon Workshop five years ago, we have strived to bring
techniques of great artists to students and professionals around the
world," says founder/director Alex Alvarez. "Feng Zhu is one of the
industry’s greatest concept artists, and he’s created seven incredible
concept design and technique DVDs for the Gnomon Workshop. Meats Meier,
one of the world’s foremost artists using ZBrush, is responsible for
two highly acclaimed ZBrush DVDs. These posters give the Gnomon
Workshop another way to bring work by these great artists to the
community."

Poster print ordering information <HERE>

 

thanks to Alex Alvarez

 

Inside CG

"Creating the Future" article by Meats Meier and Leonard Teo – article at Inside CG. "Meats Meier is an artist who has recently shot to stardom in the 3D community with the release of his short film – The future of: ART…." 

 

Read Below or <Read Here at InsideCG.com>

 

thanks Leonard Teo

 

 

 

 

 

 


Creating the Future: Meats Meier
Meats Meier & Leonard Teo, 01 March 2001


Meats Meier is an artist who has recently shot to stardom in the 3D community with the release of his short film – The future of: ART. If you haven’t already seen this short, you can check it out at iFilm. Meats shares with us the making of this wonderful short film, the highs and lows, the challenges and the satisfaction of having a production seen by so many people around the world. – Leo


The Making of The future of: ART


The future of: ART is about an artist’s quest for a reason to use his new purchases, a new rtBot painting system.

The future of: ART is about an artist’s quest for a reason to use his new purchases, a new rtBot painting system. He is sitting at a desk trying desperately to come up with an idea. When inspiration strikes, he finds that there are many obstacles to overcome if he wants to use his top of the line technological tools. In the end, the robot seems to end up with all of the glory.

My main point of the short was: technology is an amazing thing, but at this point, it is unusable to all but the most experienced. I was envisioning a world where the programs always had a million features added to them, but never improved on the core functionality.

It also laughs at the fact that great programs aren’t going to make great art. I feel like a person needs to go through a little pain to create great art, and in my opinion, you can’t skip this step no matter what the technology is. Artists may not have to clean their oil brushes anymore, but now the chore is replaced with keeping up with the tech itself. Learning new upgrades, figuring out evolving interfaces and file formats may not be a creative persons dream, but once you master them, they become second nature and the creativity can flow.

I created The future of: ART as an online demo-reel and exposure generator as well as an entertaining short. I was telling the world, "This is The future of: ART. One guy sitting in his basement (literally: five foot ceilings) has the power to create and find an audience within the same box. The "programs are overcomplicated" theme allowed me to showcase my unusual animation style.

This short was carried out in a fairly unusual way. Since I had spent so much time visualizing the story in my head, I never got around to actually creating storyboards. I worked from a rough outline and prayed for inspiration when I worked on the individual scenes. I usually have a lot of success with creating on the spot, it comes a lot easier to me than trying to write words on paper. I’ve been using Alias/Wavefront‘s Maya Since version 1.0, and doing most things within this amazing program has become second nature to me after staring at it for so many years. Seeing it evolve in 3D, I might as well be a Greek god creating my own myth. Getting up every morning with a predefined work flow may be mandatory when working with a crew, but when it is a single person, with one vision, it is easier to be a little more loose with the scripts, not having to convince any one else to understand your dream. Another reason I took advantage of the chance to work this way was because I’m sure it will be some time until I have the chance to again, as employers have this funny thing about wanting to know what they are going to get before they pay you to do it (it will be great, I swear!).

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